Minding Houston Episode IV: The Mental Health Workforce

With the 1115 Waiver making investments in behavioral health services throughout the state, and especially here in Greater Houston, it’s natural to ask the question about the professionals needed to staff these new programs. And we don’t just mean psychiatrists, but the full spectrum of mental healthcare positions, just like those masters degree clinicians from MHMRA riding along with police officers for our CIRT units. In this episode, we’ll look at the best data to describe the mental health workforce shortage that should catch everyone’s attention, especially our lawmakers.

This is Minding Houston, I’m Bill Kelly.

Before jumping into legislative solutions about how to attract more mental health professionals, it makes sense to ask the question, “do we really need them?” Or, to say it another way, what are the consequences of not having an adequate mental health workforce? A 2011 report by the Hogg Foundation for Mental Health entitled “Crisis Point: Mental Health Workforce Shortages in Texas” gives a clear answer on what we face:

The cost of mental illness does not simply disappear when service providers are not available. Instead, these costs transfer to other less effective, more expensive and unprepared environments, such as prisons and hospitals. Research and experience clearly show that the lack of sufficient mental health services often results in hospitalization, incarceration or homelessness, creating far greater economic and human costs.

Supporting a strong system of mental health services isn’t just for the benefit of people with mental illness. Mental health and wellness are important to all Texans. Without a strong mental health system, communities suffer through lost productivity, unemployment, job absenteeism, increased involvement with law enforcement, and increased local hospital costs.

Now, for anyone who cares about the bottom line in budgets, the quality of life for patients, and need for a healthy Texas, these consequences are simply unacceptable. Alright, so we know there is a problem, but how bad is it?

Hogg 11

The report sites the following:

  • Compared to California, New York, Illinois and Florida – the other four most populous states – Texas has the most severe short¬age of psychiatrists, social workers and psychologists
  • The pool of mental health professionals is aging. In the coming decade, many psychiatrists, social workers and other providers will leave the workforce for retirement.
  • These shortages are felt most acutely in rural and under served areas of Texas, such as the border region.

Code Red LogoUnfortunately, things haven’t improved since this report was released in 2011. One of the most respected health care groups in Texas just released a report this January that echoes many of the same concerns. In an interview with Houston Public Media, Code Red’s task force chair and former state demographer Steve Murdock discusses the situation with behavioral health:

Maggie Martin: Medicaid wasn’t the only issue or concern that was raised in this report and something maybe especially raised for Houston, being the home of the Texas Medical Center. What are some of the issues and concerns the task force found within the health care profession itself?

Steve Murdoc: Well, I think that’s one of the things that we found is of course In areas, particularly in behavioral health, we are very short in terms of personnel. We have a wonderful medical center and it does lots of things very well but when it comes to behavioral health we lag behind many other states. I gave you the earlier example of 49th in terms of psychiatry in the country and so certainly we have areas in our health care system where we need to provide more physicians. We have for years, for example, lacked enough residencies. Now the reason that is so important is that one of the best predictors of where a physician will end up practicing is where he or she does their residency and we actually export people to residencies in other states which means that they are likely or less likely to come back and practice in Texas. So a number of things about our program are such that indicate we can also do a better job of ensuring we can get as many of those excellent students that we produce from our medical schools to stay and practice in Texas …

The good news is the Legislature is paying attention. In fact, during the last legislative session in 2013, Republican Representative Cindy Burkett from North Texas, and Democratic Representative Carol Alvarado from Houston co-authored a bill calling for a study of the Texas Mental Health Workforce Shortage and possible solutions.

The final report was issued in the September of 2014, and as you would expect, it confirmed the very serious problems Texas will face without immediate investment. Out of the five themes discussed in the report, the first recommendation is the most important in addressing this problem. Quoting from the report:

At its core, the mental health workforce shortage is driven by factors that affect recruitment and retention of individual practioners. Chief among these factors, as studies and stakeholders suggest, is that the current payment system fails to provide adequate reimbursements for providers, especially in light of the extensive training necessary for practice.

Furthermore, more students may be attracted to the mental health professions by strengthening graduate medical education and by exposing them to opportunities in the mental health field earlier in their education.

Like a lot of public policy, it boils down to money. Our state has failed to invest in this area, and unless we start making a down payment for our mental health workforce, we will undoubtedly suffer the consequence that a lack of access brings.

That’s where Sen. Charles Shwertner comes in. The new Texas Senate Chair of Health and Human Services is tackling the issue of mental health workforce for the full spectrum of providers. The Texas Tribune’s Alana Rocha reports:

Bluebonnet officials say that a bill by health and human services committee chairman Charles Schwertner could elevate the prestige of the profession and help workers balance their desire to serve the mentally ill, make ends meet, and pay off their loans. Schwertner filed a bill Monday to create a grant program to repay loans for licensed professionals, social workers, psychiatrists and psychologists.

“Money spent on mental health is money that is effectively spent. It keeps people out of the emergency room, it keeps people out of the jails and also the school resources that are spent on individuals that need help. If you can catch someone early, get them the right treatment in the right setting that’s the way to handle mental health. It’s cost effective.”

“There’s a huge return on investment for this.”

Andrea Richardson knows first-hand as the executive director of Bluebonnet she worked with Senator Schwertner, himself a practicing physician on developing the bill that creates a commitment from professionals seeking loan reimbursement. The percentage of the loan repayment grows with each year they work in the field.

“It recognizes the value of mental health. It allows for mental health to become a part of the health care system. You know so often we disconnect the mind from the body when in reality it’s the mind and the body working together that keeps us healthy.”

An integrated approach to addressing a growing need.

So, how did this trained orthopedic surgeon suddenly becomes one of the leading advocates for mental health in the entire Texas Legislature? Well, as the Houston Chronicle Editorial Board writes in support of his bill, he might have just been listening to mother:

MASTHEAD-Houston-Chronicle

Each of our incoming legislators will bring varied life experiences to the next session and its upcoming debates over spending and priorities. That’s certainly true of state Sen. Charles Schwertner, R-Georgetown. Schwertner, one of the few doctors in the Legislature, is not only an experienced orthopedic surgeon but also has some familiarity with mental health care. Schwertner’s mother spent over 25 years as a nurse in Texas’ mental health system. The state senator has a habit of saying that he knows firsthand what impact a dedicated mental health professional can have on the life of someone suffering from mental illness.

After reviewing many of the same statistics cited in the previous studies, the Chronicle concludes:

The Legislature should make Schwertner’s mother proud and act to pass his bill, a good first step in heading off this growing crisis.

So we’ve heard from the Hogg Foundation for Mental Health, the medical experts at Code Red, a workforce shortage study of House Bill 1023, and the newly filed mental health loan repayment bills and we hope our Legislators listen to Senator Schwertner’s mom.

But what happens when we don’t listen? In this case, what happens when we fail to provide access for mental health services? Quite simply, we face the same health challenges but we face them in a criminal justice setting. More on that next time.

From Minding Houston, I’m Bill Kelly.


This weeks episode includes “Dirty Night,” “Settling In,” and “Slow Motion Strut” by composer Dexter Britain and “Ego Grinding” by Megatroid. Hear more of Dexter Britain’s music at DexterBritain.co.uk and Soundcloud and listen to “Ego Grinding” at FreeMusicArchive.com

View the 2011 Hogg Report here and read Code Red: The Critical Condition of Health in Texas for detailed information about the Texas mental health workforce shortage. Listen to the full Houston Matters interview with Code Red’s task force chair and former state demographer Steve Murdock and hear more about Charles Schwertner’s loan reimbursement bid at the Texas Tribune website. 

Advertisements

One thought on “Minding Houston Episode IV: The Mental Health Workforce

  1. Pingback: Minding Houston XV: Workforce Shortage? We have an app for that! | Minding Houston

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s